Daibutsu, Kamakura

Daibutsu, Kamakura
Daibutsu in Kamakura, June 2010. There were thousands of school kids visiting that day. It was still great fun.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Narrow Buildings

Japan is famous for having extremely narrow highrise buildings, especially in Tokyo. I actually really like these interesting buildings. Maybe I would like them so much if I had to live in one. However, this four-story building below with the large windows facing the river looks really cool. This photo is from the really interesting blog from Muza-chan. Muza-chan often posts about the narrow buildings of Japan and this building from her recent post really caught my eye due to the large windows and the great location fronting the river.


It looks like someone is looking out the window from the small building next door. Probabaly enjoying the sites of the river.

7 comments:

  1. Yeah, I odn't know if I could live in those, but they are iconic. :)

    I remember being in Hanoi, Vietnam, which also has extremely long, narrow buildings. It seems that in Vietnam, people only pay property tax, which is based on the width of the property, so people just build narrower properties to get around this. ;)

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  2. Odd. You would think the Vietnamese government would change that.

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  3. Japanese homes are pretty skinny overall. If you visit a traditional home in Japan, it does not have much floor space. The living area has no furniture because furniture takes up space. The main furniture would be the dining room table.

    I had to chance to visit the home of my wife's fathers, oldest brother. His home was handed down, generation after generation. I dare say it was impressive. It was old, large, well made and very comfortable. There are large homes in Japan but I'd say the majority of them are handed down from generation to generation.

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  4. I definitely have experience with older more traditional Japanese homes. They are certainly "cosy".

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  5. Given the opportunity, I'd opt for a more traditional Japanese home. I already live in a box in Hollywood. I sure wouldn't want to own one.

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  6. I wouldn't mind a smaller traditional Japanese home either.

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  7. Don't they call them "unagi-no-nedokoro", these narrow buildings - the sleeping place of an eel - or am I making this up?

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