Daibutsu, Kamakura

Daibutsu, Kamakura
Daibutsu in Kamakura, June 2010. There were thousands of school kids visiting that day. It was still great fun.

Tuesday, August 03, 2010

Please do it again

That's very nice of the man in the geta and massive afro offering to carry the woman's suitcase up the stairs. At least that's what I think he is going to do. Maybe that's his suitcase and he's asking her to carry it up the stairs for him because he doesn't want to trip and fall in his geta sandals.

15 comments:

  1. I actually did this for an old woman once. Plenty of opportunities to be a boy scout living in Tokyo. However, it also puts pressure on you, "do I do something, or not?"

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love your wonderful (re)interpretations of these signs. They don't really speak for themselves, do they?

    ReplyDelete
  3. @Jason. I understand your feeling. In Tokyo, they may wonder what this foreigner is doing. I would definitely help an elderly person or a mother holding a small child though.

    Thanks Toranosuke. These posters are always so funny anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What I don't understand is the "please do it again" slogan, if one did help an old lady before, isn't one very likely to do it again? Is the English translation bad?

    I think a much better slogan would be "Please help out" or "Please lend a hand" something like that.

    Please do it again kind of makes it seem like the dude failed the first attempt bringing up her suitcase.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think it's a poor slogan. They try and come up with one universal slogan and it doesn't work for many of their posters. Remember they previously had the slogan "Please do it at home". After a while the slogan made no sense when matched with the posters. Like this one:

    http://www.tokyometro.jp/anshin/kaiteki/poster/manner_200812.html

    I guess they are saying this guy should be a drunk slob at home.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I haven't seen this yet! But I didn't realize him wearing geta! That's funny!!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yes, I wonder how difficult it is carrying a suitcase with geta on? He better be careful.

    ReplyDelete
  8. However, it also puts pressure on you, "do I do something, or not?"

    And it's good for this very reason. Do good deeds over and over.

    It's probably better to focus on positive deeds than negative ones.

    (But I don't live in Tokyo and I have never seen these signs.)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Good advice. When others see good deed performed by someone else, maybe they'll be more inclined to perform a good deed themselves, even in Tokyo.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Maybe I am missing something, but...(he pauses)... clearly the story here is that this fine dude has just come into the country - and is very likely going to spoil his very tidy afro by carrying this clearly heavy suitcase around. Spotting a likely looking good samaritan, he asks politely - "excuse me - but you could be a good sport and heft this suitcase up these stairs... much appreciated."


    And who could refuse to help a visitor in such obvious need? I think we can learn a lot from this poster.... don't you?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I think you're right. I mean look at his shirt. He must of just came into the country the poor sapp.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Agreed. I'll be looking for this guy on my next visit.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I could never read Japanese so while I was there most of the signs had english translations somewhere as almost all of their income came from soldiers who were the only ones with money. Dollars. Yen. and MPC or Military Payment Certificates. The stores would take any of them in payment.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Most of the signs I see today, especially in the tourist areas such as Kamakura, have English as well.

    ReplyDelete